alt-right-crowdfunding

Major Crowdfunding Sites Are Banning the Alt-Right From Profiting Off Hate

PayPal, GoFundMe, Patreon and YouCaring — all different crowd-funding and fund-transfer websites — have begun banning people and causes associated with the so-called “alt-right,” or as we like to call them, white nationalists.

The trend started in early May 2017 when PayPal limited the accounts of “neo-Confederate” blogger Occidental Dissent and pro-rape men’s rights activist Roosh V. Shortly thereafter, they banned the account of self-professed “alt-knight” Kyle Chapman (aka Based Stickman) and put a hold on the account of WeSearchr, a site that offered a bounty for the person who punched white supremacist Richard Spencer (although PayPal says the hold was due to “business compliance issues” rather than a violation of its anti-hate policies).

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On April 30, 2017 PayPal reportedly blocked the account of Bare Naked Islam, an anti-Islam website and on June 14, 2017, PayPal limited the account of Generation Identity, a French anti-immigration group.

While PayPal has a policy of not commenting on individual accounts, it told Buzzfeed News that it does not “allow [its] services to be used for activities that promote hate, violence or racial intolerance.”

In early May 2017, the crowdsourcing site GoFundMe also banned Chapman and Milo Yiannopoulos’ college tour manager Tim Gionet (aka Baked Alaska).

“We don’t tolerate the promotion of hate or intolerance of any kind,” GoFundMe told Buzzfeed News, “and if a campaign violates GoFundMe’s term 7, we’ll remove it from the platform.”

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In July 2017, the artist donation website Patreon banned transphobic vlogger Lauren Southern — Southern says the banning “essentially eviscerat[ed] the majority of my income.” That same month, the crowdfunding site YouCaring rejected a lawyer’s fundraising campaign for lawsuits she had planned to file against Black Lives Matter activists.

Some of these people have started using other right-wing crowdfunding sites like the invite-only Hatreon (“A platform for creators, absent speech policing”), Counter Fund and the not necessarily right-wing crowdfunding site Rootbocks which proclaims “No censorship. No limits”.

 

 

Featured image by RapidEye via iStock

  • AlanSutton6

    Same sites banning rightwing thoughts seem to allow Antifa violent felons to raise money for their legal defense and even for their activities.