Milo Yiannopoulos takedown

Our 5 Favorite Parts of This ‘Daily Beast’ Takedown of Alt-Right Douchebag Milo Yiannopoulos

The Daily Beast just published a Milo Yiannopoulos takedown piece with lots of delicious details of the alt-right douchebag’s many failings.

In an article wonderfully titled “Milo Yiannopoulos Is the Walking Embodiment of Bulls**t” Daily Beast writer James Ball repeatedly takes down the racist, transphobic, alt-right figurehead as an “archetypal bullshit merchant … in the process of trying to change his name into a brand: MILO, a Madonna clone with a stuck-down caps lock key.”

Yiannopoulos is trash who has worked with white supremacists and had his book deal trashed after publicly proclaiming how grateful he was to have been molested as a child by a priest. The Daily Beast’s entire piece is deliciously rancid with details of Yiannopoulos’ fail-pile called life.

Here are 5 great bits from The Daily Beast’s Milo Yiannopoulos takedown:

 

1. Yiannopoulos once plagiarized Tori Amos in a book of pretension poetry.

Ball writes, “Milo Andreas Wagner (Yiannopoulos’s real name) also published two volumes of poetry, A Swarm of Wasps and Eskimo Papoose, a book which was later found to have used Tori Amos song lyrics without attribution and which was later dismissed by Yiannopoulos as a ‘joke book.'”

 

2. Yiannopoulos once arranged a disastrous awards show for The Telegraph.

According to The Daily Beast, Yiannopoulos once worked as a technology blogger for sixth largest British newspaper The Telegraph but got downgraded from contract staff member to a freelancer.

Sometime after that, he reportedly convinced the paper to put its name on a “Start-Up 100” awards ceremony that his newly founded events company, Wrong Agency Limited, put on for tech companies.

Ball writes:

The awards quickly descended into chaos, with the chair of the judging panel discovering when he announced the top winner that his decision had been switched without his knowledge, while a series of sponsors for the event promised by Yiannopoulos failed to materialize, leaving the Telegraph seriously out of pocket on the event — and Yiannopoulos firmly in the doghouse.

Ball adds that Wrong Agency Limited never “filed a set of accounts or any other documentation, and were struck off [official records] after missing filing deadlines.”

 

3. Yiannopoulos stiffed a bunch of writers for his failed website.

In 2012, Yiannopoulos reportedly hired a bunch of writers to produce content for his doomed website The Kernel and, according to Ball, “offered them salaries it simply couldn’t afford to pay.”

Ball adds, “Writers who had quit while still being owed thousands finally sued The Kernel for their wages. Yiannopoulos’s response was to go nuclear on any writers he suspected had talked to the media about The Kernel’s internal woes, threatening to ruin those who had crossed him.”

Yiannopoulos told one writer in an email, “You’ve already made yourself permanently unemployable in London with your hysterical, brainless tweeting, by behaving like a common prostitute and after starting a war with me.”

A court eventually forced The Kernel to pay contributors £16,853 ($22,759) in back pay.

 

4. Yiannopoulos has had five failed businesses and at least seven financial charges levied against him.

Yiannopoulos’ string of failed businesses include the aforementioned Wrong Agency Limited, The Kernel, Counterknowledge Limited, Hipster Ventures Limited and Caligula Limited — all of which collapsed after failing to secure official documentation for registry, says the Daily Beast piece.

Want to start a company without any legal obligations? Simply create a fun name and then run it into the ground with no official paperwork!

Ball adds that between November 2012 and January 2016, Yiannopoulos had “at least seven charges against him” for a combined total of £5,998 ($8,100). All seven are listed as unpaid, though Ball writes that “sometimes fines are paid but not recorded on the register.”

 

5. Yiannopoulos threw a sad birthday party in which he lied about his age.

When Yiannopoulos was 29 years old he threw himself a 27th birthday party, which is just about the saddest thing a 20-something gay man can do.

He reportedly sold tickets ranging from £55–£275 ($74 to $371), promising to donate some to charity. “Guests were promised food, champagne and ‘a trayful of expertly engineered cosmopolitans,'” Ball writes, but the party reportedly ended up half-empty. (Guests noted that everyone was on the guest list but they suspected no one had actually paid to attend.)

The booze quickly ran out and it’s said the room was decorated with cheap pop-art portraits of Yiannopoulos, one of which was stolen, circulated around London, then ending up in the trash.