is anybody down, isanybodydown, revenge porn

‘Revenge Porn’ Webmasters Are Finally Getting Punished, But There’s A Catch…

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Until April 2013, Craig Brittain (above) was the webmaster of IsAnybodyDown.com, a “revenge porn” site that posted other people’s nude pics and personal info, then charged them $250 to $500 to take them down. In a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission last month, Brittain agreed to delete all the personal pics and info and never post other people’s nudes without their permission ever again.

But in an ironic and oh so satisfying twist, Brittain has now issued a takedown request telling Google to remove 23 “unauthorized” uses of his name and image linking him to his revenge porn site. So far Google is ignoring his request.

Meanwhile, Brittain is in damage control mode. He has published an extended apology on IsAnybodyDown saying that he made no money off of the site, distancing himself from the site’s blackmail services, claiming that a majority of the site’s images weren’t revenge porn at all, and saying that he hopes to turn IsAnybodyDown.com into an anti-revenge porn site — what a saint, eh?

However, Forbes magazine points out that “a cursory look on DomainTools at the state of the site indicated Brittain is still trying to profit from IsAnybodyDown.com, with apparent plans to sell it with an asking price of $10,000…”

They also point out that Brittain is a supporter of GamerGate, the nefarious online movement that claims to be about “ethics in video game journalism” but has spent its time harassing its female critics with death and rape threats.

hunter moore, is anybody up, isanybodyup, revenge pornIt’s worth nothing that Brittain’s site was basically a copy of an earlier, now-defunct site called “Is Anyone Up?” which was founded, owned, and operated by sociopathic sleaze-monger Hunter Moore, a man who reportedly got $13,000 and 30 million pageviews a month by posting other people’s naked pics.

Moore shut down the site in April 2012 and sold it to James McGibney, the founder of the anti-bullying website BullyVille. IsAnyoneUp now leads to an open letter by McGibney where he details Moore’s increasingly unhinged antics: from threatening to burn down the New York offices of the Village Voice to threatening to rape McGibney’s wife while his kids watched.

Moore eventually plead guilty to two felony charges: one for computer fraud and abuse and and another for aggravated identity theft, he now awaits sentencing. Earlier this month, Kevin Bollaert webmaster of revenge porn site UGotPosted.com got convicted of 21 counts of identity theft and six counts of extortion and now faces up to 20 years in prison.

One might celebrate these legal victories as the beginning for the end of revenge porn sites, but Forbes writer Thomas Fox-Brewster worries that such sites will merely move to the “dark web” (anonymized websites accessible only through certain portals), making them harder to find, but also harder to litigate.