world naked bike ride

27 Photos From This Year’s World Naked Bike Ride (NSFW)

As everyone knows, June is Pride month. But there’s another fun, worldwide event that happens this month too — the World Naked Bike Ride (WNBR)! Every year, cyclists take to the streets, leaving their clothes behind. Not everyone needs to be fully nude; the dress code is “bare as you dare.” So if you’d prefer to leave your undies on, that’s totally fine. Or if you prefer to cover up with body paint, that’s cool too. But most riders choose to wear shoes and nothing else.

Though WNBR has a festival atmosphere, it’s not just for fun. The World Naked Bike Ride is a Critical Mass protest — though WNBR often call what they do “Critical Ass.” The WNBR work to make the streets safer for bicyclists, fighting for greater safety and against the car culture.

The first World Naked Bike Ride took place in 2004 in the Spanish city of Zaragoza. Since then, the WNBR has taken off. The first year only saw 28 cities participate, but by 2010, 74 had joined. Now there’s over 120 cities around the world participating, on every continent except Antarctica. (For Antarctica, give it a few years.)

The greatest thing about the World Naked Bike Ride is that events can happen whenever and wherever people want to organize one. In 2017, the two main rides were on March 11 for the Southern Hemisphere and June 10 for the Northern. However, there are still WNBR events in large cities — Portland, Oregon just held its WNBR on June 24. If you missed the one this year (or if your city didn’t have one) don’t worry! You can organize a WNBR yourself!

If you’re worried about being arrested, don’t. Very few WNBR riders have been arrested. Most anti-nudity laws are based on the concept of “indecent exposure” — and since there’s nothing indecent or sexual about the proceedings, there’s no problem. (For the most part.) And, of course, as WNBR is officially clothing optional, again, if you’re not comfortable with letting it all hang out, you have the option of only letting what you want  hang out, even if that’s not much at all.

Brighton

(all photos by Funk Dooby)

London

(all photos by Funk Dooby)

Brussels

(all photos by Miguel Discart)

Mexico City

(all photos by Felix D’Eon)

Portland

(all photos by Sam Gehrke/Willamette Week)

Featured image by Miguel Discart via Flickr)